Categories
Gender Studies

, you will construct a zine regarding any of the inequalities we discussed in th

, you will construct a zine regarding any of the inequalities we discussed in the last third of the class, as well as interventions for this inequality.
What is a Zine?
A zine, from magazine, is a short, independent publication, often concerning a social issue or problem. In the past, zines have been used for political information and organizing, disseminating art and poetry, or telling short but important stories.
For your final zine project, you will identify a social issue or problem we have discussed in the last third of the class, as well as a social movement that seeks to address the issue. The movement can be local, national, or international, and does not need to be an “official” organization. You may, for example, highlight a local community member who provides food and shelter for other community members, a local or state-specific organization like the Chicago Abortion Fund, a national organization like SisterSong or NARAL, or even an international movement like movements addressing climate change or #MeToo.
In your zine, you should:
– Identify the social issue your zine addresses
– Describe how this issue is related to gender
– Identify a social movement or movements that addresses the inequality
– Identify or propose actions that address the inequality that most people could do
As zines are often a mixed-media artistic project, you may include illustrations, images, poetry, etc. in your zine, though it is also okay if your zine is only text – however your zine must include at least some text. If you use someone else’s art or photography, please credit this person in your zine (and ask their permission for use if you plan to distribute your zine outside of class).
Your final zine should be at least 8 pages (not including the front and back covers), and you should cite at least two assigned readings from class (or the film if you wish). These citations need not be in-depth – just demonstrate you understand the connection between course material and your zine subject. You may include outside sources as well, especially if your zine covers an issue we have not discussed, like sports or sexual violence.

Categories
Gender Studies

The paper is a two-three page reflection on one of the topics we have covered du

The paper is a two-three page reflection on one of the topics we have covered during our classes. It needs to effectively tie in and reflect on 2 readings we covered regarding the topic. The paper should have a clear introduction that lays out your main takeaways regarding the topic, the body paragraphs should explore those takeaways, and a conclusion that reiterates and wraps up what you have said. If you use quotes or reference materials, you need to include proper citation (author, page number).

Categories
Gender Studies

One to two paragraphs of “reading” responses on assigned reading(s) for that wee

One to two paragraphs of “reading” responses on assigned reading(s) for that week. Your notes should respond to one or two of the following aspects of the reading: a. Experience: What issues does this text give an account of? How does the text mark its perspective? Further, what if anything does this reading conjure up for you? What connections can you build to the contemporary moment? i. Concept: How does this text define explicitly or implicitly the issue that the author is writing about? What are (if any) the theoretical underpinning of the article? ii. Methodology: How and from which disciplinary perspectives is being presented in the piece? What methods, if any were used to make an argument in this text? What are the benefits or shortcomings of this method outlined in the text? What do you think about the results? b. Critique: What – if any – are the points of criticism the author makes? How does this reading or set of readings “talk back” to previous reading? i. Impressions and questions: What are your thoughts or questions about the text? Do you think an important example, perspective, (counter) argument is missing? Must write a reading question. a. How to write a good discussion question: The goal of your discussion question is to stimulate discussion of the most important ideas contained in the book or readings that we have read. Writing a good discussion question is similar to writing a good response paper. In both cases, try to engage with some of the book or readings’ key arguments, so that we can better focus on the authors insights. Avoid narrow questions about specific facts, or any questions that elicit “yes or no” answers. Avoid questions that are overly general in nature. Avoid questions that the book’s content or argument could not possibly answer (ones that focus on the future, for example). The best discussion questions highlight a major theme of the book or reading. I will work with you to strengthen your questions over the course of the semester, so expect emails from me with suggestions on how to rethink or rephrase your class questions. I will consider the quality of your questions when the final participation grade is tabulated, taking improvements into account.

Categories
Gender Studies

a) 2 paragraphs of “reading” responses on assigned reading(s) for that week. You

a) 2 paragraphs of “reading” responses on assigned reading(s) for that week. Your notes should respond to one or two of the following aspects of the reading: a. Experience: What issues does this text give an account of? How does the text mark its perspective? Further, what if anything does this reading conjure up for you? What connections can you build to the contemporary moment? i. Concept: How does this text define explicitly or implicitly the issue that the author is writing about? What are (if any) the theoretical underpinning of the article? ii. Methodology: How and from which disciplinary perspectives is being presented in the piece? What methods, if any were used to make an argument in this text? What are the benefits or shortcomings of this method outlined in the text? What do you think about the results? b. Critique: What – if any – are the points of criticism the author makes? How does this reading or set of readings “talk back” to previous reading? b) Impressions and questions: What are your thoughts or questions about the text? Do you think an important example, perspective, (counter) argument is missing? Must write a reading question. a. How to write a good discussion question: The goal of your discussion question is to stimulate discussion of the most important ideas contained in the book or readings that we have read. Writing a good discussion question is similar to writing a good response paper. In both cases, try to engage with some of the book or readings’ key arguments, so that we can better focus on the authors insights. Avoid narrow questions about specific facts, or any questions that elicit “yes or no” answers. Avoid questions that are overly general in nature. Avoid questions that the book’s content or argument could not possibly answer (ones that focus on the future, for example). The best discussion questions highlight a major theme of the book or reading. I will work with you to strengthen your questions over the course of the semester, so expect emails from me with suggestions on how to rethink or rephrase your class questions. I will consider the quality of your questions when the final participation grade is tabulated, taking improvements into account.