Categories
Other / Addictions Counseling

Drug prevention video”

Before participating in this discussion:
Course Text
Capuzzi, D. & Stauffer, M.D. (2020). Foundations of Addictions Counseling, 4th
edition. Boston: Pearson.
Before participating in this discussion:
Read Chapters 14 & 16
Watch “Claudia Black Addiction in the Family The Domino Effect”
Watch “The Teenage Brain Is Primed For Addiction”
Watch “They Lied! Drug Prevention Video”
Watch “ Learn how to say not to drugs! A video for kids during Red Ribbon Week (Elementary School)”
Additional resource: https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/prevention (Links to an external site.)
Additional resource https://youth.gov/youth-topics/substance-abuse/evidence-based-programs-youth-substance-abuse-prevention-and-treatment (Links to an external site.)
For this discussion, respond to the following:
Imagine you were asked to develop a drug abuse prevention program based on the 9 principles outlined under “Prevention Research” on pages 340-341. Using these principles as a foundation or guide, describe your program. The additional resources above provide additional guidance into essential components of a prevention program. Be creative. (Consider advances in technology such as Apps). Remember to consider families.
*Sources are 8 including textbook and provided sources above.

Categories
Other / Addictions Counseling

However, the second situation seems the most high risk as he repeatedly stated how much he enjoyed drinking.

Response to the below discussion with the below discussion topic.
Discussion topic:
Course Text
Capuzzi, D. & Stauffer, M.D. (2020). Foundations of Addictions Counseling, 4th edition. Boston: Pearson.
Read Chapters 7 & 13
Watch “Motivational Interview with “Resistant” Heavy Drinker” (also available on YouTube)
Watch “Roadmap for Recovery (Part 4): Addressing Triggers” (also available on YouTube)
For this discussion, respond to the following 2 prompts:
1.Watch the video “Motivational Interview with “Resistant” Heavy Drinker “. Using the Stages of Change Model (pp. 138-141), describe the initial stage of change of the mock client. Was the counselor successful in helping the client move to a different stage of change? Why or why not? Support your response with at least one additional scholarly, peer-reviewed resource (not from a website or web resource) external to the textbook.
2. In consideration of relapse prevention were this mock client to become sober, what would be at least one high-risk situation for this mock client (from “Motivational Interview with “Resistant” Heavy Drinker”)?
Discussion post:1. Within the video, the mock client is currently in the precontemplation stage. He does not want to quit drinking even though his doctors have said it is bad for his health as well as his children sharing their concerns and frustrations. The client only agreed to the session because his wife has threatened to leave him if he does not stop and this time he believes she is serious. By the end of the video, the client has begun to move into the contemplation stage but I would not say he has fully transitioned there. An emotional moment was shared on how the client’s son blames him for his alcoholic behaviors and his daughter does not want him around his grandchildren as much due to his alcohol consumption. These two instances are powerful and can be used within the motivational interviewing process to spur the client into fully moving into contemplation. It felt as though the counselor was taking the client’s side against the wife and was initially agreeing with the client. However, I realized he was building rapport with the client, which was valuable as the client shared his vulnerable experiences with the counselor so quickly into the session. The counselor was also helping the client hear his own motivations for change, and then hearing them reflected (2005). For this particular client even though he felt not ready for change, his reasons would soon get him to the point in which he would be ready. Using Motivational Interviewing (MI) was most beneficial for this client as he was not ready for change but knew he needed to get there. “Research indicates that MI is particularly useful with clients who are less motivated or ready to change” (2005). As the counselor continues to meet with him and builds upon change talk, change will occur.
2. Our book states “most relapses were associated with three kinds of high- risk situations: (1) frustration and anger, (2) interpersonal temptation, and (3) social pressure” (2020, p.285). In consideration of relapse prevention were this client to become sober, the first two associations make me the most nervous. Multiple times over the short session, the client shared how he liked to do whatever he wanted. He believed he had the right to do so. Under the circumstances, it does not appear that his social network is the problem but his own desires. Therefore, if the client gave up drinking, high levels of frustration and anger within his family could lead back into drinking. However, the second situation seems the most high risk as he repeatedly stated how much he enjoyed drinking. Altering the clients thoughts and views on drinking to hinder his temptations would be very beneficial.
References:
Capuzzi, D. & Stauffer, M.D. (2020). Foundations of Addictions Counseling, 4th edition. Boston: Pearson.
Hettema, J., Steele, J., & Miller, W. R. (2005). MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 1, 91-111.

Categories
Other / Addictions Counseling

Response below discussion post. Discussion topic: Read Chapters 5 & 6 (Textbook

Response below discussion post.
Discussion topic: Read Chapters 5 & 6 (Textbook: Capuzzi, D. & Stauffer, M.D.(2020).Foundations of Addictions Counseling, 4th edition. Boston: Pearson.) Watch the video “The Clinical Assessment of Substance Use Disorders-role modeling the initial visit” (also available on YouTube)
For this discussion, respond to the following:
Watch the video “The Clinical Assessment of Substance Use Disorders-role modeling the initial visit” (also available on YouTube) and identify the screening instrument utilized by the provider to assess presenting needs. (The screening instrument is one of those described under “Substance Use Disorder Instruments” in Chapter 6, pp. 124-129.)
Read the Case Study “The Case of Dwayne” in Chapter 9, pp. 198-204. Use the American Society of Addiction Medicine’s biopsychosocial dimensions (Table 5.1) to organize the relevant parts of Dwayne’s case. In your application, you are responding to the italicized questions (found within table 5.1 at the beginning of each dimension.
Discussion post:
The provider in the video administered the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory- 4 (SASSI-4) with the client. The practitioner attempts to subtly examine the motivation behind and frequency of the client’s prescription drug use. She is able to maintain a conversation with the client while gaining information about the client’s drug and alcohol use, and how it impacts her work, home and family life.
Dimension 1: Acute Intoxication and Withdrawal Potential
Dwayne is currently drinking 4-6 beers a night. When he is able to, he drinks a pint of vodka each week. Dwayne also smokes about 5 cigarettes of marijuana each week.
Dimension 2: Biomedical Conditions and Complication
Dwayne is in good physical health and not currently on medication for any recurrent health issues. He is of large, athletic build.
Dimension 3: Emotional, Behavioral and Cognitive Conditions and Complications
Dwayne tends to be impulsive when faced with opportunities to engage in physical altercations. Due to his impulsivity and history of fighting, stealing, truancy and theft, he was diagnosed with an adolescent onset conduct disorder. Dwayne’s propensity for violence and impulsivity began to be apparent before his alcohol use.
Dimension 4: Readiness for Change.
Dwayne is in counseling due to an expulsion; he pulled a knife on a peer which caused him to be removed from school. In order to return to school, Dwayne was ordered to complete three counseling sessions. He completed those sessions and was soon expelled again for an alcohol related infraction. These past occurrences seem to suggest Dwayne is not ready to change his alcohol abuse. Although Dwayne has been able to abstain from alcohol and drug use to receive benefits from his family, he does not seem intrinsically motivated to change. Motivation to change is an important factor in successful drug treatment (DiClemente et al., 1999). Further, Dwayne denies he has an issue with alcohol abuse and expresses he can stop using alcohol when he wants to, despite becoming intoxicated even when he plans to only partake in one or two drinks. Dwayne has experienced many consequences due to his drinking; his expulsions, he has been kicked off of his athletic teams, and his once high GPA has fallen. He has also been in trouble with the law on multiple occasions, including for a pending rape charge, due to his drug and alcohol use.
Dimension 5: Relapse Prevention And Continued Use or Problem Potential
Dwayne has completed a 28 day inpatient alcohol treatment in the past. Due to issues getting to treatment following discharge, he did not complete aftercare. Dwayne has also attended Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, but did not continue the meetings beyond two weeks. Dwayne lives with his mother and seems to be lacking a supportive adult in his household to provide transportation, or access to transportation, to successfully commit to alcohol treatment sessions or meetings.
Dimension 6: Recovery Environment
Dwayne lives with his mother in a majority White neighborhood. Dwayne lacks a positive male figure in his life; his mother has a boyfriend but Dwayne does not like him. Dwayne’s father has been absent from his life for years, and when his father was around, he was physically abusive to Dwayne. Due to Dwayne’s race (African American), he reports feeling out of place in his majority White community. Dwayne’s mother appears to have some potentially emotionally abusive communication with Dwayne, but she is interested in receiving professional help with her parenting. Dwayne’s mother has not been helpful with his continued treatment in the past, but with family therapy, this may change.
DiClemente, C. C., Bellino, L. E., & Neavins, T. M. (1999). Motivation for change and alcoholism treatment. Alcohol research & health : the journal of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 23(2), 86–92.